Monday, June 3, 2013

How to Deal With Fading Daffodils


To me, daffodils mean spring.  It's not until I see that riotous yellow color bursting out throughout my garden that I believe that at long last winter is behind us.

Spring Color in the Garden
The trouble with daffodils is that their lovely color quickly fades and you are left with just the green leaves.  That wouldn't be too bad except for the fact that they wilt, turn brown and turn your lovely garden into a mess.

Fading Daffodil Leaves


I know I should leave the leaves in tact for about six weeks after the daffodils bloom in order for the bulbs to grow and be healthy for next year's bloom.  If you are like me, you become impatient with the increasingly unsightly mess in the garden.

I've tried a number of methods to bring order to the chaos.  I've knotted the leaves.  In my Martha Stewart days I even braided each and every clump in my garden!  The technique I've settled on is folding each clump of leaves over on themselves and holding them in position with an elastic band, like this...

My Banded Daffodil Leaves
After the six weeks are up I can just pull each clump out of the ground with one good yank.  The bands disintegrate in my compost pile along with the leaves.  I found this to be the easiest way to keep up with this garden chore.

How do you deal with your daffodil clean up?

Enjoy!

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2 comments:

  1. I know I should do this, but instead I just let the leaves fall every which way, and eventually they seem to fall out on their own. If I leave them long enough, I like to think they compost back into the garden. The daffodils are surrounded by my free-range mint, which grows up to mask the dead leaves.

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    Replies
    1. I only wish I could leave them be, Lydia. You are a much more patient gardener than I.

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